Pt 2 of 2 Stuart Jay Raj เหนือชั้น 1000แปลก Bali Trunyan Corpses EN Subs

Languages: Thai, Balinese, Bahasa Indonesia สจวท เจ ราชพาไป บาหลี ประเทศอินโดนีเซีย ไปพบกับต้นไม้ประหลาดและความเชื่อแปลกๆของคนบนเกาะบาหลี http://stujay.blogspot.com Direct link: http://www.manytv.com/videos/10461-_1000_.php This is the first in a series of clips from Bali, Indonesia. Bali is different to the rest of Indonesia in that it is predominantly Hindu. The Trunyan village (from Taruh – Place / Menyan – Corpse) is renowned for the strange practice of placing dead bodies to decompose next to a special tree that is said to absorb the smell of the rotting corpses into the tree! While I was there, there were 11 corpses decomposing, but no smell! … believe it? .. take a look at the clip and judge for yourself :) (Shame there’s no such thing as smellovision!) The trip there was interesting. At first, our guide refused to – there are rumours of people being robbed and even murdered going out there. In the end, it was an issue of $$$MONEY$$$. We paid ‘security’ money to the right people and the hospitality there was fantastic. If you’re planning a trip there, make sure you have a few rupiah spare for ‘extra costs’ that suddenly appear once you arrive … and again when you try to leave!. The Trunyan village is deep up into the lake between the volcanoes Gunung Batur / Gunung Agung.


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Stuart Jay Raj is a polyglot who specializes in the languages and dialects spoken in South East Asia and China. His talents have allowed him to earn a professional living as a simultaneous interpreter in Thai, Mandarin, Cantonese, and Indonesian, among others, providing language and cultural training for multinational companies in the region and hosting his own TV programme on Thailand's Channel 5. He holds a degree in Cognitive and Applied Linguistics from Griffith University and has become an expert in the field of language acquisition with a strong track record of success. Stuart's background knowledge of Sanskrit, Khmer, Lao and various Chinese dialects and minority languages enables him to present a fascinating and unique perspective on the Thai language which makes everything fall logically into place.